17 Magnesium Filled Foods That Can Lower Your Risk of Anxiety, Depression, Heart Attacks And More

Magnesium is the key to optimal health and proper biological function. Not only is the 4th most abundant mineral in our bodies, but there have been found over 3,750 magnesium-binding sites on human proteins in our bodies, too.

In fact, over 300 enzymes rely on this nutrient for optimal function. This tells a lot about its importance for our biochemical processes, most of which are vital for pepper metabolic function. This includes:

– Proper formation of bones and teeth

– Regulation of blood sugar and insulin sensitivity

– Creation of ATP (adenosine triphosphate)

– Relaxation of blood vessels

– Muscle and nerve function

Lack of Magnesium Can Trigger Serious Health Problems

Lack of cellular magnesium leads to deterioration of cellular metabolic function, which eventually causes some serious health issues.

This includes anxiety and depression, migraine headaches, cardiovascular disease, sudden cardiac death, fibromyalgia, and death from all causes.

Magnesium is important to body`s detoxification processes as well, including the synthesis of glutathione.

Ultimately, magnesium is needed for optimization of mitochondria,  which is of utmost importance for cancer prevention and general athletic and energy performance.

The Importance of Magnesium for Mitochondrial Health

Mitochondria are organelles found within the cells. All organs need energy to function normally, and that energy, known as ATP, is mostly produced in the mitochondria.

Growing evidence suggests that most health problems stem from mitochondrial dysfunction, so getting the precursors and nutrients that the mitochondria needs is extremely important for the overall health, exercise performance, and disease prevention.

According to mitochondrial researcher Rhonda Patrick, Ph.D., magnesium plays an important role for mitochondrial health, primarily because the oxidative capacity depends on mitochondria`s ability to produce energy within the cells.

How Much Magnesium Do You Need?

About a century ago, people received nearly 500 mg of magnesium from daily diet, due to the nutrient-dense soil in which their food was grown.

These days, people only get about 150-300 mg daily from dietary sources.

The RDA is around 310-420 mg daily, depending on age and sex, while some researchers suggest taking as much as 600-900 mg for optimal health.

According to Dr. Carolyn Dean, the intestinal reaction can be used as a marker for the right dose. Start by taking 200 mg of magnesium citrate daily and gradually increase the dose until you experience loose stools.

As for magnesium supplements, magnesium threonate is one of the best options. It is extremely effective in penetrating cell membranes, including the mitochondria and blood-brain barrier.

Risk Factors, Signs and Symptoms of Magnesium Deficiency

Eating a heavily processed diet is the major risk for magnesium deficiency as magnesium resides in chlorophyll molecule.

Eating leafy greens and other magnesium-dense foods once in a while means that you are not getting enough of it from your diet.

Magnesium is also lost through lack of sleep, prescription drug use (fluoride, statins, antibiotics), stress, and alcohol consumption.

All of these factors affect a large percentage of Americans, so the fact that 50-80% of Americans are deficient in magnesium doesn’t come as surprise.

Some of the earliest signs of magnesium deficiency include muscle spasms, migraines, headaches, fatigue, weakness, nausea, vomiting, and loss of appetite.

Chronic magnesium deficiency can lead to problems like seizures, numbness, tingling, abnormal heart rhythms, coronary spasms, and personality changes.

What Are the Foods High in Magnesium?

Eating dark-green leafy veggies is one of the best ways to boost your magnesium levels as well as to maintain healthy levels. Juicing these greens is a good way to get the most of them! The leafy greens with the highest amount of magnesium include

– Kale

– Bok Choy

– Turnip Greens

– Collard Greens

– Beet Greens

– Swiss Chard

– Romaine Lettuce

– Brussel Sprouts

– Broccoli

– Spinach

Other foods that are particularly rich in magnesium include:

– Raw cacao nibs and/or unsweetened cocoa powder

– Avocados

– Fruits and berries

– Squash

– Seeds and nuts

– Herbs and spices (cumin, parsley, mustard seeds, fennel)

– Fatty fish

When Supplementing, Balance Your Magnesium with Calcium, Vitamin K2, and D

When one relies on supplements, it is important to understand how nutrients affect and interact with each other.

For instance, it is of utmost importance to balance between magnesium, calcium, vitamin K2, and vitamin D. These nutrients work in synergy and any imbalance increases the risk of stroke, heart attacks, and vitamin D toxicity.

– The best ratio between magnesium and calcium is 1:1. Note that the need for supplemental magnesium might be two times greater than calcium given that you are likely to get more calcium from your diet

– According to Dr. Kate Rheaume-Bleue, for every 1,000 IU’s of vitamin D you take, you may need from about 100 micrograms (mcg) of K2

– As for the vitamin D intake, get your vitamin D level tested twice annually to determine your personal dosage

Children Who Eat 12 or More Hot Dogs Per Month Have 9 Times the Normal Risk of Leukemia

Processed meats no doubt contribute to a large number of childhood cancers. According to the National Cancer Institute, over 1,500 children die each year in the United States from childhood cancer (http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet…).

According to a L.A. Times article:

Children who eat more than 12 hot dogs per month have nine times the normal risk of developing childhood leukemia, a USC epidemiologist has reported in a cancer research journal. Two other reports in the same issue of Cancer Causes and Control suggest that children born to mothers who eat at least one hot dog per week during pregnancy have double the normal risk of developing brain tumors, as do children whose fathers ate hot dogs before conception.

Hot Dog Cancer Risks

Here are the chemical additive ingredients that cause cancer and other diseases. Here are the ingredients for Oscar Meyer hot dogs:

MECHANICALLY SEPARATED TURKEY, PORK, MECHANICALLY SEPARATED CHICKEN, WATER, CONTAINS LESS THAN 2% OF SALT, FLAVOR, SODIUM LACTATE, CORN SYRUP, DEXTROSE, SODIUM PHOSPHATES, SODIUM DIACETATE, SODIUM ASCORBATE, SODIUM NITRITE.

Message from The Hearty Soul: Processed meats like hot dogs pose an unnecessary health risk to children, but they are dangerous for adults too!

We’ve added the following section to shed more light on the effects of hot dogs and other processed meats on the body over time.

Peter Clifton, professor of nutrition at the University of South Australia, puts it this way: “All data says processed meat is bad: more diabetes, higher mortality, more cardiovascular disease.” Clifton has run studies that found a direct correlation between processed meat consumption and type 2 diabetes (he compared them to regular red meat consumption- and processed was far worse).

Mariana Stern, a cancer epidemiologist at the University of California says about the questionable chemical found n processed meats, “Regardless of where the nitrates come from,” says Stern, “they can be converted by oral bacteria intro nitrites, which in turn can react in the stomach … to form N-Nitroso compounds, which are well-established cancer-causing agents.”

Americans eat roughly 20 billion hot dogs a year, as well as large amounts of bacon, cold cuts, and other processed meats.

Each daily serving of processed meats increases the risk of dying prematurely by 20 percent, including from cancer, according to a study from the Harvard School of Public Health.

Every year, more than 140,000 Americans are diagnosed with colorectal cancer and more than 50,000 die of it.

Eating processed meats increases the risk of colorectal cancer, according to a large number of studies, including the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study.

Studies also show a strong link between other types of cancer and processed meats. An NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study, for example, found that processed red meat was associated with a 10 percent increased risk of prostate cancer with every 10 grams of increased intake.

A study in Taiwan showed that consumption of cured and smoked meat can increase children’s risk for leukemia. A study in Australia found that women’s risk for ovarian cancer increased as a result of eating processed meats.

What to Eat Instead

So the next time you’re tempted to grill up some hot dogs for yourself and the kids, or line everybody’s sandwiches with processed turkey, you’d better think twice about it.

But that doesn’t mean goodbye to convenient lunches for good! Try some of these recipe and meal prep ideas to help keep you out of the kitchen, but full of nutritious, non-cancer-linked food.

1. Make a batch of chia seed pudding the day before and top with whatever you like! We’re big fans of coconut chips, pumpkin seeds, and berries.

2. Fill up on plant-based protein sources– no need for processed meats here!

3. Craving bacon? You might want to try this famous seaweed that tastes uncannily like bacon (and it’s even better for you than kale).

4. There’s nothing wrong with a peanut butter sandwich! Choose raw, organic peanut butter (not the stuff from you know who) or any of your favorite nut butters, for that matter. Almond butter or cashew butter, topped with some slices of banana? Delicious.

5. Use your slow cooker!